Talking or keeping silent about parental mental health problems: A grounded theory of parents' decision making and experiences with their children

Wren, Bernadette and Nolte, Lizette (2016) Talking or keeping silent about parental mental health problems: A grounded theory of parents' decision making and experiences with their children. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 42 (4). pp. 731-744. ISSN 1752-0606

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Abstract/Book Review

This grounded theory study explored parents' experiences of responding to their children's need for understanding parental mental health concerns. Fifteen parents with severe and enduring mental health difficulties participated in the study. The findings suggest four main social processes that influence parents' talk with their children about parental mental health issues, namely “Protecting and being protected,” “Responding to children's search for understanding,” “Prioritizing family life,” and “Relating to others.” Implications of the findings for clinical practice and future research are considered. In particular, the need for more family-orientated services where parents experience parental mental health problems is highlighted.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: E-pub ahead of print - Jun 2016
Subjects: Communication (incl. disorders of) > Communication
Disabilities & Disorders (mental & physical) > Classification of Mental Disorders
Families > Parent Child Relations/Parenthood
Families > Families - Psychology
Department/People: Children, Young Adult and Family Services
Depositing User: Ms Linda Dolben
Date Deposited: 23 Jun 2016 17:22
Last Modified: 14 Mar 2017 15:12
URI: http://repository.tavistockandportman.ac.uk/id/eprint/1315

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