Whose memories are they and where do they go? Problems surrounding internalization in children on the autistic spectrum

Rhode, Maria (2012) Whose memories are they and where do they go? Problems surrounding internalization in children on the autistic spectrum. The International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 93 (2). pp. 355-376. ISSN 0020-7578

Full text not yet available from this repository.
Full text available to Trust users only. Shibboleth Password required: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/shibboleth/wayfless...

Abstract/Book Review

Recent work in neuroscience has highlighted the contrast between ‘procedural’ memory for bodily experiences and skills, which is unconscious though unrepressed, and verbalizable, ‘declarative’ memory, which includes autobiographical memory. Autobiographical memory is weak in people with autistic spectrum disorder, who frequently turn to self‐generated sensations for reassurance that they continue to exist. The author suggests that, instead of internalizing shared experiences leading to growth, children with autism can feel that they add to themselves by taking over the qualities of others through the ‘annexation’ of physical properties that leads to a damaged object and can trigger a particular sort of negative therapeutic reaction. Clinical illustrations drawn from the treatment of two children on the autistic spectrum illustrate some ramifications of these processes in relation to the sense of a separate identity and the capacity to access memories.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Article first published online: 25 Jan 2012
Uncontrolled Keywords: Autism, Autobiographical Memory, Internalization, Pervasive Developmental Disorders
Subjects: Communication (incl. disorders of) > Autism
Department/People: Children, Young Adult and Family Services
Depositing User: Ms Linda Dolben
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2012 09:50
Last Modified: 09 Feb 2016 10:28
URI: http://repository.tavistockandportman.ac.uk/id/eprint/651

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item