Journalists reporting on hazardous events: Constructing protective factors within the professional role

Davidson, Sarah and Novak, Rosemary J (2013) Journalists reporting on hazardous events: Constructing protective factors within the professional role. Traumatology, 19 (4). pp. 313-322. ISSN 1085-9373

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Abstract/Book Review

The way journalists report on hazardous events can put them at increased risk of traumatic exposure; however, the vast majority do not experience extreme stress reactions indicative of stress related disorders. The current study investigated the experiences of members of the media in order to gain a better understanding of the resources that facilitated their coping and resilience. Grounded theory was used to analyze 10 semistructured interviews with members of the media who report on hazardous events overseas. The research found that identifying with their professional role appears to be a protective factor in dealing with hazards. Training which fostered connections to social networks, and individually meaningful coping mechanisms were found to increase resilience. These techniques also mitigated against prolonged distress whilst simultaneously contributing to positive developments. The implications of these findings are discussed with regard to the literature, opportunities for growth, and implications for journalists in particular.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Published online before print March 28, 2013
Subjects: Groups & Organisations > Occupational Groups
Human Psychological Processes > Stress
Department/People: Special Units
Depositing User: Ms Linda Dolben
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2015 12:23
Last Modified: 10 Nov 2015 12:23
URI: http://repository.tavistockandportman.ac.uk/id/eprint/1107

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