An investigation of the transference to determine the usefulness of crosscultural child psychotherapy in the development of the patient’s self

Junor-Sheppard, Sean (2018) An investigation of the transference to determine the usefulness of crosscultural child psychotherapy in the development of the patient’s self. Professional Doctorate thesis, Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust/University of East London. Full text available

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Abstract

This thesis is a single case-study of a Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist working with a patient who is a teenage, female, adolescent from a Bangladeshi, Muslim background. The patient being categorised as a second generation immigrant by society is pertinent to this thesis. The thesis presents the completed four years intensive psychotherapy (three times a week) of the patient’s treatment. The patient commenced this treatment when she was 17 years of age. The patient’s struggles to negotiate her adolescence can be tracked back to her difficulty in separating from her primary object, her internalisation of religion in her early years, and her introjection of an ‘Islamophobic’ society in her adolescence.The patient withdrew psychically and physically from the demands of the external world in mid-adolescence and suffered with psychotic-type symptoms, depression and anxiety. The effectiveness of the patient’s treatment involved the Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist helping the patient negotiate her adolescent identity by bringing together the views that she had of their self with those held in the patient’s family and wider community. Issues of gender, race, ethnicity and culture were consistent themes in the patient’s treatment and the use of the Child and Adolescent’s countertransference to the patient was integral to understanding the patient’s relationship to them. The primary research method used to analyse processed clinical sessions notes was Grounded Theory Method.

Item Type: Thesis (Professional Doctorate)
Additional Information: Thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust and the University of East London for the degree of Professional Doctorate in Child Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
Uncontrolled Keywords: Professional Doctorate in Child Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
Subjects: Children, Young People and Developmental Pyschology > Adolescents - Psychotherapy
Race and Culture > Culture and Psychotherapy
Research, Tests, Assessments > Psychotherapy Research
Research, Tests, Assessments > Grounded Theory
Department/People: Children, Young Adult and Family Services
Research
URI: http://repository.tavistockandportman.ac.uk/id/eprint/1968

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