Medical students’ perceptions of the use of feature films to teach the mental state examination

Kowalski, Christopher and Conn, Rory (2017) Medical students’ perceptions of the use of feature films to teach the mental state examination. BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning . ISSN 2056-6697

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Abstract/Book Review

Existing studies have explored the use of feature films to teach undergraduate medical students about psychiatric conditions.1–3 However, there are no existing studies examining medical students’ perceptions of the use of film to teach the mental state examination (MSE)—the clinical tool by which clinicians assess and report a patient's mental state separate from any purported diagnosis. Since students are most likely to undertake an MSE when meeting patients with mental illness for the first time, it seems practically more useful for film to be used to teach this. The MSE is divided into several sections: appearance and behaviour, speech, mood, thoughts, perceptions, cognition and insight. Since portrayals of mental illness on film vary in the veracity of their depictions, focusing students’ observations on these specific areas may help prevent generalisation about how mental illness presents. We explored students’ experience of teaching the MSE using film clips along with their perceptions of which aspects of the MSE such media are best suited to teach.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: In Practice Reports. Published Online First: 02 January 2017
Uncontrolled Keywords: Medical Education
Subjects: Health and Medical Sciences > National Health Service
Psychological Therapies, Psychiatry, Counselling > Consultation
Department/People: Children, Young Adult and Family Services
Depositing User: Ms Linda Dolben
Date Deposited: 09 Jan 2017 17:05
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2017 17:01
URI: http://repository.tavistockandportman.ac.uk/id/eprint/1468

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