Clinging, gripping, holding, containment: Reflections on a survival reflex and the development of a capacity to separate

Cavalli, Alessandra (2014) Clinging, gripping, holding, containment: Reflections on a survival reflex and the development of a capacity to separate. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 59 (4). pp. 548-565. ISSN Online: 1468-5922

Full text not yet available from this repository.

Abstract/Book Review

This paper attempts to describe how, in the very first months of extra-uterine life, personality structures are formed around notions of personal space, separateness, attachment and individuation. The contribution of a forgotten Hungarian analyst, Imre Hermann, who wrote about the 'clinging reflex', will be explored in relation to the origin of Bowlby's concept of attachment and Rey's theoretical understanding of personal space. Particular attention will be given to transitions, transitional experiences and the development of a sense of internal space. Vignettes from infant observations will be used to illustrate the theoretical frame of reference. Clinical material from the analysis of a child and an adult patient will be provided to postulate how a distorted perception of personal space and separateness in the first few months of life may affect the capacity to attach and to individuate.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Article first published online: 22 Aug 2014
Uncontrolled Keywords: First Object of Relatedness, Individuation and General Space,Internal Space,Gripping, Marsupial Space,Separateness, Transitions
Subjects: Children, Young People and Developmental Pyschology > Child Development
Emotions, Affective Psychology > Attachment/Affectional Bonds
Department/People: Visiting Lecturer
Depositing User: Ms Linda Dolben
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2015 15:31
Last Modified: 10 Nov 2015 15:36
URI: http://repository.tavistockandportman.ac.uk/id/eprint/1095

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item